Press

The Plane Crash (2012)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
“One of the most spectacular sights you will ever see on TV”
 
“An investigative science documentary of jaw-dropping vision and ambition… an amazing and unprecedented television experiment… an extraordinary documentary”
 
“The crash is genuinely spectacular and the lessons learned are valuable… This is a documentary you are likely to remember”
 
“Eye-catching… a TV spectacle”
 
“Nail-biting… impressive… extraordinary.  It was all compelling viewing in an extremely old-fashioned televisual way: we were watching something thrilling that had genuinely never been shown before”
 
“Compelling.  It’s extraordinary television – mesmerising and terrifying, strangely exciting too…  Plane Crash is giddily thrilling.”
 
“Spectacular… dramatic”
 
“Remarkable… disturbing but intriguing”
 
“The sheer gall of it is admirable, and the technological achievement (the 727 essentially becomes the world’s biggest remote-controlled aircraft) remarkable. And that’s to say nothing of the footage of the crash itself, far more tense and impressive than any Hollywood CGI-fest”
 
“Moving”
 
“You’ll never forget to do up your seatbelt again.  Riveting”
 
“One of the most spectacular documentaries of the year”
  
 
“Remarkable”
 
“The moment it hits the ground is both terrifying and visually stunning”
 
 
“Interesting… cool slow-motion”
 
“Edge-of-the-seat story…  Even though it’s a test, the on-board cameras make it feel all too real”
 
“It makes for amazing viewing”
 
 
 
  
“Documentary of the week…  spectacular television…  completely absorbing and often exciting…  when it comes, the actual ‘accident’ is both terrible and stunning”
 
“A jaw-dropping new documentary… spectacular… amazing”
 
 
 
  
“Chilling — and spectacular”
 
 
 
 
 
  

Out of Control? (2012)

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 

Seeing Stars (2011)

     
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“Ben Lawrie’s entertaining film observes scientists anaesthetising ants and gluing weeny rucksacks to their backs, ladies knitting inside MRI scanners and a golfer with the yips, all in the interests of revealing the hidden secrets of the human brain”
 
“An incredible documentary in which scientists explore the secret world of the unconscious mind… proof that science can be discussed in an eye-catching, brain pleasing manner”
 
“Astonishing”
  
“Mind-expanding”
 
“Cool experiments”
  
“Absorbing… surreal yet revealing”
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
“This is one of those Horizon films which stirs a pure sense of wonder”
 
“This fascinating film follows the men and women who are pushing the limits of science and engineering in some of the most extreme environments on Earth”
   
“Thrilling”
 
“A fascinating look into a nocturnal, coffee-fuelled world where stars that twinkle are a problem that needs solving”
 
“Even viewers who struggle with science will be charmed”
  
“A film about the ongoing renaissance in telescope construction may sound like a tough sell, but the combination of stunning photography, mind-boggling science and quaintly prosaic terminology (the biggest telescope in the world is called the VLT – the Very Large Telescope) proves irresistible.  In scenes guaranteed never to make you take the accumulation of knowledge lightly again, assorted boffins assemble telescopes while dealing with altitude sickness, film dying stars from the back of a moving jumbo and splash some $6.5 billion in the process.  The fact that they don’t really know what they’ll find out doubles the risk, but also the appeal”
  

 

 

Surviving a Car Crash (2010)

Critics choice - The Times  |  The Telegraph  |  The Independent  |  The Guardian  |  The Daily Express  |  The Sunday Times  |   The Sunday Telegraph  |  Timeout  |  Radio Times
 
 
 

Other projects…

  

 

 
 
 
 
     
 
 
 
  
 
   
“Catastrophe is a triumph”
“Creationism takes a back seat to science at its most spectacular in a superb five-part series about how massive natural disasters have influenced evolution on our planet – not always for the bad”
 
 
 
“After watching this I guarantee you won’t take take anything as read ever again as this truly breathtaking series ends by explaining the extraordinary cosmic flukes which have helped make Earth habitable”
 
 
 
  
  
  
“History television at its best”